Clark School Home UMD

ISR News Story

ISR researcher finds bats are quieter in groups

The web site Live Science reports that bats flying in groups do not use their echolocating voices as often as bats flying solo. Recent research by Professor Cynthia Moss (Psychology/ISR), ISR Graduate Research Assistant Chen Chiu, and Psychology Faculty Research Assistant Wei Xian found that in groups, up to 76 percent of the time at least one bat is quiet for more than 0.2 seconds.

"It doesn't sound like a long time, does it?" Moss told Live Science. "But in bat time, 0.2 seconds is a long time. Typically they're producing sounds with intervals of maybe 0.02 to 0.05 seconds."

The scientists can't be sure the bats' periods of hush were intended to avoid misjudging and flying into things, but it seems like a reasonable conclusion, Moss said. "It's also possible that they're trying to sneak up on the other one, showing some stealth behavior. Or they may be trying to save energy. But it seems like the most likely or dominant reason would be to minimize the jamming, and that’s because they tend to do it more when their signals are more similar."

Read the story at the Live Science website.

August 26, 2008


Prev   Next

 

 

Current Headlines

International Workshop on Cyber Deception and Defense addresses threats and countermeasures

Bioinspired robotics REU students present final projects

MC2 Researchers Have Six Papers Accepted to USENIX Security Symposium

Engineers Without Borders Provides Electricity for Yabucoa Elder Care Center in Puerto Rico

A New Dimension for Batteries

Former ISR Visiting Scientist Kazutomo Nishida named Honda R&D Asia Pacific president

Company Co-Founded by Rajiv Laroia Receives $121 Million Investment

John Baras to receive 2018 AIAA Aerospace Communications Award

Shneiderman to speak at Arena Civil Dialogue, Aug. 12

ISR remembers George Reynolds

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar