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DeVoe wins DURIP for deep reactive ion etcher

Assistant Professor Don DeVoe (ME/ISR) is the principal investigator for a new Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) award. DeVoe's award is for a Deep Reactive Ion Etcher The award is one of six recently announced DURIP awards for the University of Maryland, five of which were won by faculty in the Clark School of Engineering.

ISR Directory Gary Rubloff called the Deep Reactive Ion Etcher "a critical component of ISR's capability for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication and nanotechnology. Both are central to a number of key ISR efforts in a broad range of sensor/actuator technologies and their systems-level implications and applications," he said.

Dean Nariman Farvardin announced the other engineering DURIP awards won by the Clark School :

  • Virtual Platform for Design and Control of Structural Acoustics, Prof. B. Balachandran (ME), principal investigator
  • Refractometer and Particle Image Velocimeter for Controlling the Structure of Spray, Prof. A. Gupta (ME), principal investigator
  • Pulsed Radio Frequency Signal Diagnostic System for Gyro-Amplifier Research, J. Rodgers (IPR), principal investigator
  • Rotorcraft Vibration Control, Structural Integrity and Stability, Prof. N. Wereley (AE), principal investigator

Farvardin said, "Obtaining such awards makes it possible for the college to more rapidly build up its research laboratories. I wish to congratulate the successful PIs and thank them for their hard work in securing the funds we need to modernize and improve our research facilities."

About DURIP
The Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) supports the purchase of state-of-the-art equipment that augments current or develops new university capabilities to perform cutting-edge defense research. DURIP meets a critical need by enabling DoD-supported university researchers to purchase scientific equipment costing $50,000 or more. In 2001, the Department of Defense plans to award $45 million to academic institutions to support the purchase of research instrumentation. The 242 awards to 99 academic institutions are expected to range from about $50,000 to $1,000,000 and average $186,000. More information from the Dept. of Defense

February 17, 2001


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