Clark School Home UMD

ISR News Story

Chopra is principal investigator for NSF nonlinear system tracking control grant

ISR-affiliated Assistant Professor Nikhil Chopra (ME) is the principal investigator of a three-year, $325K grant from the National Science Foundation for “Tracking Control of Nonlinear Systems Under Sensing, Computational, and Communication Constraints.” The grant is part of NSF’s Energy, Power and Adaptive Systems program.

The research will investigate control algorithms for resource constrained trajectory tracking in nonlinear systems. Tracking controllers are widely utilized in several applications, for example in robotic systems for manufacturing applications. However, the implementation of these controllers is subjected to several practical constraints that limit overall system performance. In applications, such as robotic systems for industrial automation, these problems have prevented the realization of high precision tracking, thereby stymieing the potential impact of robotic systems. In contrast to time-triggered periodic sampling, a Lyapunov function based event-triggered approach will be utilized for addressing resource constrained tracking in nonlinear systems.

The research deals with the design of tracking controllers for nonlinear systems under sensor, computational, and communication constraints. The approach is based on event-triggered controllers for trajectory tracking in nonlinear systems and by co-designing event- triggers and quantizers for nonlinear systems. The research will lead to the development of a hybrid control framework where various resource constraints can be treated in a unified manner. This approach will provide a rigorous solution to the important problem of tracking in robotic systems under sensor constraints, thereby significantly impacting industrial automation.

The understanding of resource constrained trajectory tracking using an event-triggered controller will provide a useful alternative to the classical time-triggered control framework. The research should significantly enhance the tracking performance of robotic systems under sensor constraints and render them viable for several emerging manufacturing applications.

Related Articles:
Maryland Robotics Center featured on live TV broadcast
Helping robots remember
Machine Learning's Translational Medicine
Realistic simulator improves safety of self-driving vehicles before road testing
Do Good Robotics Symposium to explore technologies that benefit society and the planet
Alumnus Xiaobo Tan elevated to ASME Fellow
Czech prime minister views AI, VR, AR and computer vision research
Cornelia Fermüller joins ISR affiliate faculty
Regli is co-PI for ARM functional interoperable compiler project
Maryland Robotics Center team demonstrates robots at 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting

August 21, 2012


Prev   Next

 

 

Current Headlines

Clark School student teams sweep MAV competition

Alum Domenic Forte receives $1M ECASE-Army cybersecurity award

2019 Dean's Doctoral and Master's Student Research Awards

Simon, Lau to investigate neural bases of natural language understanding

Helping robots remember

University Medal Awarded to Electrical Engineering Senior Jerome Quenum

Smart signals, safer intersections

BBI Announces FY19 Seed Grant Awards

Clark School Research in the News: Transplant Organ Flown by UAS

Have You Seen this Cube?

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar