Clark School Home UMD

ISR News Story

Naviasky, an ECE Student, Spoke at the 2014 Winter Commencement

Emily Naviasky was selected as the student speaker for the 2014 A. James Clark School of Engineering Winter Commencement. Photo credit: Al Santos
Emily Naviasky was selected as the student speaker for the 2014 A. James Clark School of Engineering Winter Commencement.
Photo credit: Al Santos

Emily Naviasky, receiving a double degree in electrical engineering and computer science, will deliver the Clark School of Engineering Commencement Address at the Winter Commencement on December 21, 2014.

Throughout her University of Maryland career, Naviasky has been very involved in both the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Computer Science.  She has taken part in the Honors College Gemstone program by participating in research to motivate and monitor physical therapy patients during exercise. In 2013, she was selected to be a University of Maryland MERIT Scholar and spent the summer participating in sensor design research with her mentor, electrical engineering professor, Dr. Pamela Abshire (ECE/ISR). Following that experience, Naviasky was chosen to present her research at the Grace Hopper Conference. In addition, that same research was published at two conferences: the International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS) and Biomedical Circuits and Systems (BIOCAS).

For the past two and a half years, Emily has served the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering as an Undergraduate Teaching Fellow teaching impressionable undergraduate minds how to “less frequently burn circuits”. She has also been active in the ECE Student Leaders program and assisted in department recruitment efforts. Emily interned at Intelligent Automation Inc., and more recently at Amazon’s Lab 126, an inventive research and development company that designs and engineers consumer electronic devices.

Following her commencement, Emily will be working in Austin, Texas at Silicon Labs to prototype and demo RF chips. In the fall, she plans to pursue a Master’s degree in electrical engineering with a specialization in microelectronics.

Related Articles:
Alumnus Omur Ozel joins George Washington University as tenure-track faculty
Khaligh Leads NSF-Funded REU and IRES Summer Programs 
Ulukus Named ECE Associate Chair for Graduate Studies
ECE Inducts Three New Distinguished Alumni
Alumnus Ravi Tandon Receives 2018 Keysight Early Career Professor Award 
ECE Names 2017-2018 Distinguished Dissertation Fellows
Ulukus named Anthony Ephremides Professor in Information Sciences and Systems
NSF Funds Novel Research to Create Scalable Wireless Networking, Averting Usage Crisis
Itzhak Tamo Accepts Assistant Professorship
ECE Ph.D. Candidate Menon Wins Kulkarni Fellowship

December 17, 2014


Prev   Next

 

 

Current Headlines

Can Cascading Pools Help Restore the Chesapeake Bay?

Maryland students place third in autonomous drone race

Bhattacharyya awarded NIH Grant to Explore Real-time Neural Decoding for Calcium Imaging

UMD Transportation Experts Awarded $1 Million DOE Grant to Reduce Transportation Energy Use and Emissions

With Engineering Projects, UMD Students Seek to Boost Education Access, Public Health, and Sustainability

Maryland Robotics Center students participate in FAA STEM outreach event

Shoukry, Krishnaprasad receive NSF grant for resilient-by-cognition cyber-physical systems

Maryland Robotics Center sponsors grad student project on robotics in farming

UMD researchers awarded $1M NSF grant to develop new methods to generate single photons for quantum research

NSF funds Shamma, Espy-Wilson for neuromorphic and data-driven speech segregation research

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar